Jupiter does not revolve around the Sun as it was believed

by Kelvin
Jupiter does not revolve around the Sun as it was believed

Jupiter, the king of the planets, does not revolve around the sun as you learned in school (or not exactly). The planet observed by Juno, a gaseous mastodon whose mass is 2.5 times larger than that of the rest of the planets of the Solar System, is so, but so massive that its center of gravity is not precisely the sun. The truth is that the center of gravity between Jupiter and the sun resides at a point in space a little beyond the surface of the star.

This is how it works: when a small object orbits a large object in space it does not necessarily travel in a perfect circle around the larger one. Instead, both objects orbit a combined center of gravity.

  

For example, when the earth orbits the gigantic sun, the center of gravity resides so close to the center of the larger body that the impact of this phenomenon is imperceptible. The largest object does not seem to move; The little one seems to make a circle around him.

Similarly, when the International Space Station orbits the Earth, both the Earth and the station orbit its combined center of gravity. But that center of gravity is so close to the center of the earth that it is impossible to locate it with the naked eye. Thus, it seems that the station drew a perfect circle around the planet. With RPP information.

The same law is fulfilled with most planets that orbit the sun. The star king so large that the Earth, Venus, Mercury and even Saturn have their centers of gravity in the depths of the sun.

It is not the case of Jupiter. According to NASA, the gas ball is so large that its barycenter is 7% of the radius of the sun beyond the surface of the great star. Jupiter and the sun revolve around that point in space, as the image shows.

On this note

escort malatya escort bursa escort antalya escort konya mersin escort